McCaw Cataract Surgery

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With the significant help of our favorite veterinary ophthalmologist, Dr. Paul Jackson (deceased), along with our favorite human ophthalmologist, Dr Art Giebel, we removed a cataract from a McCaw.

This page has graphic surgical pictures.


Anesthesia

Birds tend to be more sensitive to anesthesia than most mammals, so special precautions are taken to minimize the risk. We always perform pre-anesthetic diagnostic tests prior to surgery to make sure there are no internal problems.

We use special monitoring equipment during the surgery in all our recent surgeries

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Equipment

In addition to the substantial surgical expertise of our surgeons, this surgery is not possible without special equipment, especially a dual surgical microscope.

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Dr. Paul and Dr. Art work together during the surgery

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Surgery

A microscopic incision is literally made into the eye near the cornea. The cataract is emulsified just like in people. A new lens is not put in, unlike in people.

The eyelids have been pulled away and the incision is about to begin

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A probe is inserted into the incision

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The opening is made larger

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The cataract is sucked out

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If you enlarge this photo and look carefully you will see the very fine suture material in the lower right corner used to close the incision in the eye

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Our happy surgery team, from left to right-

Art Giebel, MD

Carl Palazzolo, DVM

Paul Jackson, DVM

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Our patient ready to go home

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A healed eye

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