What’s Been Happening at LBAH

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Check out this extensive list of people, pets, medical and surgical problems, and staff that we have been involved with over the last year.

Medical Case of the Week (con't).

This is the radiograph of the dog below 20 days after treating with an antibiotic. The lungs are now normal.

There are many different causes to a cough. This illustrates the need for diagnostic tests in order to find the cause. Only then can you institute proper therapy.
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Medical Case of the Week (con't).

The red circle shows the problem area in the radiograph below of the coughing dog.
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Long Beach Animal HospitalThis is what pneumonia looks like on a radiograph.

4 days ago
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Medical Case of the Week

This large breed dog came to us with a coughing problem. There are many causes to this, can you tell from the chest radiograph what the cause might be?
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Suzanne Deverfluid in the heart?

4 days ago
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Long Beach Animal HospitalHeart is OK, there is no fluid in the heart.

4 days ago   ·  1
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Sarah Ditterline RileyCollapsed lung?

4 days ago
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Judy KupperUpper respiratory infection?

4 days ago
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Sherri EngelbretsonIt looks like the heart is enlarged. If doggie is coughing there my be fluild around the heart?

4 days ago
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Liu EthanLung lobe collapse

4 days ago
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Long Beach Animal HospitalThose that said "collapsed lung" are getting closer.......

4 days ago
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Sarah Ditterline RileyLung lobe torsion?

4 days ago
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Long Beach Animal HospitalLung lobe torsion is a possibility, but it actually is pneumonia. So the posts above to learn more.

3 days ago
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Sherri EngelbretsonGet better woof woof.

3 days ago
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Mystery Radiograph

This abdominal radiograph is from a 9 year old large breed dog that was very lethargic and had a stringy discharge from its mouth.

Any idea what is going on?
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Mary Ann Speicherlooks inpacted

5 days ago
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Suzanne Deverflipped stomach?

5 days ago
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Sarah Ditterline RileyBloat?

5 days ago
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Liu EthanGDV

5 days ago   ·  1
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Long Beach Animal HospitalGood job everyone, this is a GDV (gastric dilatation volvulus), also known by the slang term bloat. The stomach has distended and twisted on itself. The tremendous gas distention causes shock and death if not corrected. We did emergency surgery on this case on Sunday night at 10 PM. The long term prognosis is not good, and many dog do not make it.

4 days ago
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Long Beach Animal HospitalCan you tell from the radiograph that the stomach is not only distended, but that it is also twisted? The twisting is the volvulus part of the Gastric Dilatation Volvulus.

4 days ago
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Colleen HershonCan you please explain the stringy discharge from the mouth? Thank you.

4 days ago
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Long Beach Animal HospitalSaliva that is produced in the mouth and flows down the esophagus and into the stomach backs up because it cannot enter the stomach.

3 days ago   ·  2
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Male Cat Urinary Problem

We have had several of them recently, with the potential for severe consequences. All cat owners need to be vigilant for this problem, especially when you cat becomes obstructed and cannot urinate.

To learn about this disease, and how to prevent it, we have a detailed page on our web site:

www.lbah.com/wo…/feline/feline-urinary-tract-disease/

This is the radiograph of a cat that cannot urinate. The bladder, the large circular white object to the right, is very distended. You can even see small bladder stones inside of it.
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Nancy SalemMy Teddy may have this, need to check him when he comes in next Mon

7 days ago
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Long Beach Animal Hospital added 2 new photos.

Medical Case of the Week

This little dog was attacked by a large dog. He had numerous puncture wounds, had an abdominal hernia from the trauma, could not use his back legs well,and was in shock.

After we stabilized him we took radiographs to assess internal damage. We found something we did not expect. See if you can see it in the first radiograph. The second radiograph has arrows that point to the problem area.

This stresses the importance of thorough diagnostics, since our patients cannot talk to us and tell us what they feel. We repaired the hernia a few days later and this little guy should recover well.
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Darleen MarieIs this the doggy that got attached in north Long Beach? If it is I'm glad to see that he will make it!

7 days ago
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Staff Christmas Party

We had it last night (don't ask why we do it in January) and everyone had a great time. The gourmet food, courtesy of Dr. Kennedy and her mother, was outstanding. You will see their dessert table, full before the party, then empty at the end, as a testimonial to how much everyone like their food.

Everyone seemed happy with their presents, and the games that Sandra organized went on well into the night! Now we just have to clean up the room!
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Amy HansonLooks like a fun party!

2 weeks ago
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Long Beach Animal Hospital added 2 new photos.

Wildlife Case of the week

This turtle came to us after being run over by a pickup truck! Incredibly, she seems to be in remarkably good shape. She has an old healed wound on her lower shell (plastron), and a small wound with a localized infection on her upper shell (carapace). Otherwise, she didn’t seem to suffer any other major damage from her recent trauma.

We took a radiograph to look for any other injuries, and were surprised to see a fish hook inside of her! Upon extending her neck and taking an additional radiograph, it was apparent that the hook was lodged in her neck. Our amazing technician, Terri, was able to remove the hook using an instrument to gently grab it and pull it out.

The turtle is recovering in a warm tank, with antibiotics, pain medication, and plenty of food. When she is active and healthy, she will be released back into the wild.

Red- eared sliders are an invasive (non-native species), so it is not ideal to place them back in the wild, but there are local areas that are home to healthy populations of these turtles, so it will be released in one such area.
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Darleen MarieKinda interesting that at first I thought it was a frog... since their legs are bent!

2 weeks ago
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Colleen HershonGlad you got the hook out

4 days ago
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Wildlife Presentation

Dr. P is giving another presentation at Brix in Sunset Beach on Jan 31st at 6 PM. All are welcome.

It is an entertaining, informative, and educational presentation on his 30 years of wildlife photography.

brixsunsetbeach.com/location/
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Amy PearsonPlease tell me kitty isn't dead.

3 weeks ago
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Long Beach Animal HospitalIts a sedated female mountain lion in Idaho.

3 weeks ago
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Amy PearsonWhew. I saw the blanket and figured it wasn't, but wanted to make sure :) And she's absolutely gorgeous.

3 weeks ago
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Long Beach Animal Hospital added 2 new photos.

Cheyenne's New Year's Resolutions

They speak for themselves!
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Jamie CaparoYour sooo fluffy cheyen I will still try and hold you and remember to give you a treat.

3 weeks ago
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Azelynn ArrevaloCheyenne let me pet her and listen to her purrs when I needed it the most. I owe her some treats.

3 weeks ago
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Cold Season

Yes, many of us have been victims in the last few months. This is a reminder to all that when cats get a cold (Upper Respiratory Infection), it can sometimes be serious, especially on younger and older pets.

It can turn into bronchitis or pneumonia, they can get ulcers on their tongues, along with significant nasal discharge. When their nostrils are clogged they cannot smell, and will not eat well. They can also get a high fever and not want to eat, leading to dehydration.

The picture is of our staff cleansing the nostrils on a cat with a chronic upper respiratory infection. You need to be observant at all times for any sign of a discharge.
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Brad WingersThat looks like a gorgeous little girl!

3 weeks ago
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Suzanne DeverWhat about sneezing? I have a 15 year old cat who has sneezed and gotten a cold every winter since he was a kitten. I watch him for URI and it always clears up. Is not wanting to eat the marker for when to have him see the vet? Because that's never happened :)

3 weeks ago
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Long Beach Animal HospitalCheck out this link on the sneezing cat written in the Long Beach Post by Dr. P-http://lbpost.com/life/pets/2000010210-the-sneezing-cat

The Sneezing Cat3 weeks ago   ·  1

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Rabbit TLC

This bunny came in with a severe fracture of its femur. We are putting on a temporary bandage prior to surgery.

Rabbits are popular pets. We have lots of information regarding them on our web site at this link-
www.lbah.com/word/rabbit-diseases/
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Extern Final Diary

Today is the last day of my astonishing externship at Long Beach Animal Hospital, and this will be my final Daily Diary. What seemed to be a long 3 week externship has flown by very quickly.

It has been a great pleasure being part of the LBAH team during these past weeks and being exposed to so many diverse and exciting cases. I have learned a lot, was challenged daily, and have gained much more confidence in my abilities and skills in the veterinary field.

Most importantly I was warmly welcomed by the wonderful staff working here and felt as an important member of the medical team during my externship. Many kind thanks to Dr. P and his amazing team for this unforgettable experience! And a special ‘Thank you’ to my veterinary school, the Royal Veterinary College, for giving me this opportunity as a student, and to my loving family for always believing in me and encouraging me to continuously move forward and grow!

For the final ‘Case of the Day’ I would like to focus on behavioral/psychological problems in our animal companions. More dogs and cats are euthanized for psychological problems than for any other reason. These psychological problems include: anxiety, aggression, inappropriate marking, noise phobias, etc.

It is important to remember that early and correct training and treatment therapies can dramatically change these patients’ and their owners’ lives. The available medical treatment is very under-used, yet if applied correctly, can make a world of a difference and will greatly improve the quality of life of animal and human members of the household.

Happy New Year!

Please visit our website for more details on behavioral problems in pets:

www.lbah.com/word/services/behavior/
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Lizzie WoodThanks for all your help, Anna! We enjoyed having you! Best of luck on everything ahead of you :)

3 weeks ago   ·  1
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Nancy SalemGood way to end diary

3 weeks ago   ·  1
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Karen McCuneAs long time clients and friends of LBAH, we can only say that you have learned from the best.

3 weeks ago   ·  1
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Edward WaltonGreat work.. take care of yourself 👌🏽 ...and have a GREAT NEW YEAR 🎉

3 weeks ago   ·  1
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Svetlana WebberDear daughter, you did your best during this externship as always! Your love of animals, compassion,hard work and diligence in learning will make you a great veterinarian. I and the family are very proud of you!!! We wish you the best in coming New 2017!!!🎄🎉❤

3 weeks ago   ·  1
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Extern Daily Diary

I learned the importance of not relying solely on those hi tech diagnostic tests that are commonly used. Even though they are very important, they are only part of the picture. A diagnosis on a pet starts with a good history (what an owner observes at home) and physical exam.

In the physical exam we check for everything. Our patients are weighed and their temperature is taken. Do you know the normal temperature ( its a range) of a dog? After the temperature we look at the color of the gums and check the capillary refill time (CRT).

Next come the eyes, ears, nose, and mouth. We look at the lymph nodes (including tonsils), then palpate the abdomen for any problems. After the abdomen its the heart and lungs with a stethoscope. Finally, after checking the reproductive organs, we run our hands along the full length of the body and legs, looking for any problems.

You can do some of this this at home, we have instructions on our In Home Exam page. We will teach you how next time you come in- www.lbah.com/word/tips/weekly-health-exam/

To learn much more on how we make a diagnosis we have an interesting page-
www.lbah.com/word/?s=Diagnostic+Process

Emily and I are getting ready to examine a wonderful patient in for a skin biopsy today. Tomorrow is my last day, rumor has it I am supposed to bring donuts to the staff!
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Cute Cat

One of our feline patients was caught admiring one of his distant (and much larger) cousins.
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Nancy SalemVery cute

4 weeks ago
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Extern Daily Diary

Today I did a necropsy (the animal version of an autopsy) on a hawk. Birds and reptiles have dramatically different anatomy on the inside, so there is a lot to learn. It was a great opportunity for me to learn about avian anatomy.

A unique aspect of avian anatomy and physiology regards the reproductive organs. Birds only have one ovary, which is on the left side, and looks like a cluster of small grapes. This hawk was a female.

Please visit our website to learn about bird medicine:
www.lbah.com/word/avian-medicine/

And about the wildlife care at LBAH:
www.lbah.com/word/wildlife-care/
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Extern Daily Diary

Today was Diabetes Mellitus (sugar diabetes) day.

Diabetes Mellitus (DM) is not an uncommon disease seen in veterinary patients. It is a complex disease that can be very challenging to control, particularly in cats. Treatment of this disease requires commitment on the owner’s part, usually for the life time of the pet. The effort is very worthwhile though, because the response is usually very rewarding, and gives the pet a chance to live a good quality life.

Insulin is the mainstay of treatment. Once a pet has been put on insulin it needs to be monitored and adjusted. We do this with a glucose curve. This is done by checking the blood glucose every 2 hours throughout the day. We do not need to send the blood to an outside lab, it is done in-house, and we get the results instantly.

Please visit our website for detailed information on Diabetes Mellitus in cats and dogs:

www.lbah.com/word/canine/diabetes-mellitus-sugar-diabetes/
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Nancy SalemCheyenne rules!

4 weeks ago
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Extern Daily Diary

Today I assisted Dr. Kennedy on a guinea pig that had such a bad eye infection this summer that the eye had to be removed. In spite of antibiotics after surgery it has a persistent infection, so today we explored the area to determine the source of the infection.

We removed infected tissue, used the laser to cauterize the area, then inserted a special gel impregnated with antibiotics into the eye socket before we sutured the eye socket shut. This special antibiotic will release medication over several months.

Our patient did very well under anesthesia, and the procedure was a success. We are looking forward to seeing her completely healed at the next visit!

Please visit our website to learn about guinea pigs and the various diseases that we see in them:
www.lbah.com/word/guinea-pig-diseases/

All of our surgical patients receive a thorough preanesthetic exam prior to surgery. I learned how to examine a guinea pig today!
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Extern Daily Diary

Today our cardiologist, Dr. Fred Brewer, performed an echocardiogram on a 15 year old Chihuahua with a murmur.

I learned about the various heart diseases that dogs could acquire that may cause a loud heart murmur, and what structural changes to look for on echocardiogram in order to diagnose these illnesses.

We also discussed the medical options available to treat this disease, and came up with a customized treatment plan. This will make her feel a lot better, and will drastically improve her quality of life.

Cardiology is a fascinating medical specialty, and with modern day medicine and technology, it has a lot to offer to patients that have been affected by heart disease.

To learn more about heart disease in dogs and cats please visit our website. Be forewarned though, there is a lot there, and it is complicated, so pace yourself.

www.lbah.com/word/canine/heart-disease/
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Wildlife Case of the Week- Red-Tailed Hawk Eye Injury

It was brought to us with an eye injury, which is easy to see on the first photo. This was most likely caused by trauma of some unknown origin, probably being hit by a car or running into something like a window.

After a thorough exam by our wildlife veterinarian Dr. Wood, it was determined there were no other problems, and medication was prescribed for the eye several times per day. It started healing as expected over 4 days, then suddenly took a turn for the worse.

At this point it was sent to a veterinary eye specialist. The diagnosis is posterior synechiae with iris bombe, which means the iris has adhered to the lens. It also has uveitis, which is inflammation of the iris and surrounding structures. All of this medical jargon means the iris and internal fluid in the eye are severely inflamed and scarred, and will probably never heal enough for sight to return. This bird will probably remain blind in this eye the rest of its life. It is not releasable in this state since it would not be able to hunt.

We don’t give up easy, and will be medicating this eye while it rehabilitates with the expert people at South Bay Wildlife Rescue. They will be applying eye medication several times per day. Eventually they will put him in a special flight cage so he can learn to hunt with one eye in a controlled environment. In a few weeks the eye will be checked to monitor healing progress. We will update our FB page if there are any significant changes.
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Extern Daily Diary

It has been a fulfilling day at LBAH with many opportunities to learn and get hands-on experience examining and treating patients.

Our patient that had surgery for the prolapse yesterday is eating well and ready to go home.

Today Dr. P and I did rounds on a cat with asthma. Asthma, seen more often in cats than dogs, is a serious disease. The cause of asthma in cats is not fully understood, but irritants such as tobacco smoke, pollen and perfume are thought to be the culprits.

When diagnosed early enough asthma can be managed successfully with inhalant medication, just like in people. Please visit our website to learn more about asthma in cats: www.lbah.com/word/canine/asthma/

In an exam on a cat with suspected asthma we give extra attention to the respiratory system by listening to lung sounds with a stethoscope. We monitor the respiratory rate, and use a Pulse Oximeter to measure oxygen concentration in the patient’s blood.

This patient (Cheyenne our mascot) has nothing to worry about as my exam revealed that his respiratory system is healthy and in good condition!
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Extern Daily Diary

I started my day in rounds with Dr. P. We went over a cat that has what is called a liver shunt. In this disease, which is more common in dogs, the blood does not flow through the liver properly. The liver cannot detoxify waste products in the blood, and ammonia builds up in the bloodstream, causing a vast array of problems.

If you would like to learn more about liver disease in cats and dogs, visit our website for more details:

www.lbah.com/word/canine/liver-disease/

I also saw a very unusual case of a kitten that has a prolapse of his rectum. It might have been due to straining from parasites, which is a reminder to get all young dogs and cats wormed.

I watched Dr. Kennedy and Dr. Ridgeway do the surgery to repair the prolapse from inside of the abdomen. This kitten should be good to go and lead a normal life. Never dreamed I would see such an unusual case, so glad the kitten will feel much better soon.

To learn more on how we do surgery at LBAH follow this link:
new.lbah.com/word/surgical-services/
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Nancy SalemExcellent work. Thank you.

1 month ago
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Lola RiverWalkerUmm...my little Alice Apple Fritter five hundred names till we decide Gracie is a girl lol. Awww glad you had the opportunity to learn about this! You all have done such a wonderful job!

1 month ago
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Extern Daily Diary

I worked with a pot bellied pig today taking care of its hooves and teeth, and also giving it a shampoo. The most important lesson I learned was to make sure you sedate it first!

If you follow this link you can learn how we spay and neuter pot bellied pigs- www.lbah.com/word/pot-bellied-pigs/

I had my first exposure to NAD (non anesthetic dental). It is amazing how gentle they hold the dogs and cats while also giving them a thorough scaling. They lay perfectly still, and in no time they are done. Quite impressive!

Our Dental page talk all about NAD- www.lbah.com/word/canine/dental-disease/
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Extern Daily Diary

I learned how much effort and professionalism goes into dental care, especially on pets with periodontal disease.

I watched how the staff at LBAH anesthetized a dog, took dental radiographs, did a detailed oral exam, and then took care of the many problems this dog had.

I assisted in charting the oral exam, scaling and polishing the teeth. Putting the foamy fluoride on the teeth was the most fun. Our patient went home feeling better and with nice white teeth!

There is so much on dental disease, and it is such a major problem in animals, that LBAH has a detailed web page dedicated to it:
www.lbah.com/word/canine/dental-disease/

In the first picture I am charting the X-ray findings.
In the second picture I am preparing to polish the teeth.
In the 3rd picture I am helping polish the teeth.
In the last photo you can see the ultrasonic scaler in use. Its the best way to remove the plaque.
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Nancy SalemYou do a great job scaling.

1 month ago
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Extern Daily Diary

Today was Carbon Dioxide (CO2) surgical laser day.

In veterinary school I was not exposed to the laser for surgery, even though the surgeons at LBAH have been using laser for surgery for over 20 years. I watched a dog neuter and a growth removal by the laser. The most impressive part is the lack of bleeding during the surgery.

To learn much more about the surgical laser follow tihs link:
www.lbah.com/word/services/laser-surgery/

After surgery Dr. P gave me an opportunity to set the machine and carve my initials in a tongue depressor (he calls them popsicle sticks)!
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Julian Wolf has arrived!

Talia had her baby last night. It was a wonderful birthday present for her because he arrived on her birthday!

Yea Talia!
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Nancy SalemSo cute!

1 month ago
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Meredith KennedyWow!! Congratulations, Talia!!!

1 month ago
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Extern Daily Diary

My first ferret case!

Today I saw a ferret that was weak and not eating well. There are several causes to this in the ferret. One of them is cancer, which is common in ferrets.

A blood panel and radiographs were taken. No abnormalities were found, except for an enlarged spleen, which is not uncommon in ferrets.

Symptomatic therapy did not work, so an ultrasound was performed. Enlarged lymph nodes were found in the small intestines that are probably due to cancer. Medication was adjusted to help him feel better.

In the first picture I am happy because I get to work on a ferret.
The second picture is a radiograph of this ferret. Can you visualize the enlarged spleen?
The last picture shows an enlarged lymph node in the small intestines found during ultrasound.
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Meredith KennedyWe wee a lot of exotic animals at LBAH, as well as plenty of interesting cases with dogs and cats.

1 month ago
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Extern Daily Diary

My second day at LBAH has been another busy day.

It started in rounds with Dr. P going over diagnostic tests on 4 dogs. We made treatment plans and set up discharge sheets. There is lots of information to be shared with the owner of these dogs, so we will be talking to her in person tomorrow to makes sure she understands everything.

Today was radiology day. Dr. P showed me how to diagnose cervical disk disease in a 15 year old Jack Russell terrier. In the picture below the arrow points to the area with the potential problem.

You can find more detailed information about Disk Disease (IVD), its causes, the available treatment options and prognosis on the hospital’s website:
www.lbah.com/word/canine/disk-disease-ivd/

Tomorrow we will be going over Hypoadrenocorticism, and then tomorrow night its sushi! I'm not a huge fan of raw fish, so maybe I can find something else on the menu?

The arrow points to the problem disk. Can you see it?
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Extern Daily Diary

Today has marked my very first day of my externship at Long Beach Animal Hospital. My name is Anna Satirovici, and I am a veterinary student from London. I will be at LBAH for the next 3 weeks.

It has been a busy, fulfilling, and exciting day meeting the members of the medical team, interacting with patients and owners, and discussing the interesting cases coming in through the doors.

I started the day doing rounds with Dr. P, learning critical thinking, and ended the day watching our radiologist do an ultrasound and biopsy on a sick cat.

For the past several days Dr. P and his medical team have been working with a hospitalized patient which is a 15 year old cat that has multiple health problems including Chronic Kidney Disease and arthritis.

One of the ways that this patient is managed is through a medical modality known as Veterinary Neuronal Adjustment (VNA). This was the first time in my veterinary career that I have seen that modality in use and it has truly interested me. I even talked to a client who brings her 18 year old pets in several times per week for this treatment.

Here is the VNA link if you want to learn more:
www.lbah.com/word/services/vna-veterinary-neuronal-adjustment/

What a fulfilling and eye-opening day at LBAH! It's almost 10 PM, and I am ready for bed!

Here I am watching a video on VNA in one of the exam rooms.
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Alla IavnaiaАнечка,ты большая умница. Ты будешь очень хорошим ветеринарным врачем . Ведь любовь к животным у тебя с детства. Я очень рада за тебя.Успехов тебе и удачи.

1 month ago   ·  1
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Long Beach Animal HospitalThank you kindly for your warm words and wishes! They are very encouraging and truly mean a lot to me!

1 month ago
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Svetlana WebberWay to go, Anna!!! Proud of your hard work and dedication 👍🏻😊❤️

1 month ago   ·  1
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Meredith KennedyGreat to have you, Anna!

1 month ago   ·  1
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Tina WebberCongratulations Anna Satirovici!

1 month ago   ·  1
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Joseph LanCome on Anna, I wrote a lot more than this for my extern diaries! Haha, just kidding! I hope you enjoy your time at LBAH. They are amazing!

1 month ago   ·  1
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Barn Owl Release

We released the barn owl with the injured wing. If you follow this link to our Wildlife Program you can see the whole story and watch a video of its release:

www.lbah.com/word/wildlife-care/
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Meredith KennedyBack to nature. Excellent work, everyone!

1 month ago   ·  2
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Nancy SalemGreat picture. Happy owl.

1 month ago
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Birthday Girls

It was a special day for Terri and Talia- Happy Birthday!

Talia is off on preggers leave for the next 3 months. Stay tuned for a picture of her new baby soon!
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Dorisa SandersHappy bday Terri!! Remember me?

1 month ago
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Nancy SalemHappy Birthday to both of you

1 month ago
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Cathy Ingber GarciaHAPPY BIRTHDAY!

1 month ago
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Lois Grant-VizardHappy Birthday Ladies!!!

1 month ago
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Long Beach Animal Hospital added 2 new photos.

Extern Daily (and final) Diary

Today is my last day of a whirlwind 2 week externship at LBAH. It has gone by so fast! I wish I could stay longer and learn so much more. Special thanks to all the Doctors and Staff at LBAH that were all so knowledgeable and helpful.

Today I learned about how to handle Chronic Kidney Disease (CKD) in cats. Many factors need to be taken into consideration in their care as this cat is hospitalized and being treated. Here is a picture of me reading her radiograph for other problems before we start treatment on her.

We have a very detailed page on our web site on this common cat disease- www.lbah.com/word/canine/kidney-disease-chronic-renal-failure/

We also reviewed a case of a sick ferret that taught me how to recognize clinical signs of insulinoma and adrenal disease in ferrets. These are very common diseases of that ferrets as they age. Here is a link to both of these diseases on our web site- www.lbah.com/word/ferret-diseases/

On Sunday I get to be a assistant photographer to Dr. P as we release a rehabilitated Barn Owl. It is great to see the fruits of our labors and see recovered animals returning to their habitat.
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War Dog Christmas Donation
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Extern Daily Diary

Wild animals are frequently admitted to our wildlife program with traumatic injuries. Learning how to work with them is one of the reasons I am doing my externship at LBAH. Over 1,000 injured wild animals are treated here every year, so there is a good opportunity for me to learn.

I learned the proper way to examine a wild animal thoroughly, yet rapidly, to minimize stress. This duck has a severe laceration that needs special attention.

I assisted Dr. Y in suturing the laceration. It's good to see all of my training come into focus as Dr. Y guided me in the proper way to repair it.

Only a few more days left in my externship at LBAH!
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Nancy SalemI saw the poor duck come in wrapped in a towel. Glad you were able to save it.

2 months ago
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Extern Daily Diary

My first week at LBAH flew by. I learned a lot, was kept busy, and can't wait to learn new things this week. My National Board exam is on Thursday, so I will be studying for that also.

I learned of the importance of good dental care in animals. It is a rampant and overlooked problem, causing pain and a decreased quaity of life in many animals.

The web site for the Long Beach Animal Hospital explains dental disease in animals thoroughly. If you have a dog or cat you should be aware of this- www.lbah.com/word/canine/dental-disease/

Radiographs are an important aspect of caring for animals with dental disease. Our patients cannot talk to us and tell us which tooth is painful. We need to rely upon our thorough oral exam and dental radiographs.

The advent of digital radiography has dramatically increased our ability to find lesions and infected areas. Today I learned how to take and interpret them.

In the photo I am monitoring anesthesia while our technician Antoni cleans the teeth. Once Dr. Y and I look at the radiograph we will take appropriate action.
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Great Horned Owl Release

Thanks to all the work done by the staff at the Long Beach Animal Hospital Wildlife Program, along with all the professional and hard work done by Christine and everyone at South Bay Rescue, we released a Great Horned Owl at the Eldorado Nature Center yesterday. Thanks to everyone for making this a successful release!

Our friend flew off immediately, landed in a tree, checked out his new home, and promptly went off to do owl things.

To learn how we care for wildlife for free at our hospital follow this link- www.lbah.com/word/wildlife-care/
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Mike RobelottoHow cool is that! Congratulations and way to go, sis!

1 month ago
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You Make the Diagnosis (on the cat below)

The arrow points to the problem. The tail has been traumatized, and there is a separation in the coccygeal vertebrae. The nerves in this area go to the bladder, and now the cat cannot consciously urinate. Urine fills up in the bladder until it is so large it passively overflows. It is incontinent.

This sets the cat up for an infection in the bladder and the skin the perineal area, not to mention the discomfort and interference with the other internal organs.
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You Make The Diagnosis

This cat was lethargic and had difficulty urinating. Take a look at this radiograph and see if it has any information as to the cause of this cat's problems.
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Lisa Belisle-HarrisFur balls.

2 months ago
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Nancy SalemKidney stones

2 months ago
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Long Beach Animal HospitalClose, but not quite. What is that big white round thing?

2 months ago

2 Replies

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Tammy BoykinBladder. A very full bladder.

2 months ago
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Cody Vaughn GibsonDistended bladder due to blockage.

2 months ago
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Long Beach Animal HospitalCorrect, a very full urinary bladder. Any clues on this radiograph as to why this urinary bladder is so distended?

2 months ago
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Tammy BoykinBladder stone/s???

2 months ago
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Sherri EngelbretsonThe stomach looks huge. If indeed that is what I am looking at. Obstrustion? Also male kitty is intact. Maybe that is the bladder? I must know!!

2 months ago
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Mary Ann Speicherplease tell me that round mass is not his bladder

2 months ago   ·  1
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Long Beach Animal HospitalThe round mass is this cat's urinary bladder. Anybody see the reason why?

2 months ago
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Tammy BoykinDid something happen to his urethra???? The xray pic is small on my phone.😜 ok. Is he constipated and the feces is pushing on his urethra.???

2 months ago   ·  1
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Long Beach Animal HospitalYou might need a screen bigger than your phone to see the problem. He is constipated because his urinary bladder is so large that feces cannot pass through.

2 months ago
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Long Beach Animal HospitalFor a clue as to the cause of his problem look at his tail near his pelvis.

2 months ago   ·  1
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Brad WingersThought lazy spine at first. I was wrong.

2 months ago
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Long Beach Animal HospitalNot sure what lazy spine is Brad, but it's not that. Study the radiograph, I will show the answer tomorrow.

2 months ago
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Long Beach Animal HospitalThe bladder and urethra in this cat are not blocked. It is able to pass urine.

2 months ago   ·  2
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Michelle VigilCould whatever is impacted in the large intestine compress a nerve(s) which makes for difficulty in urination? Fecal impaction, foreign body or hair ball? 😦 whatever the cause- looks extremely uncomfortable!!

2 months ago
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Long Beach Animal HospitalSee the post from this morning Michelle to see the answer. You are on the right track when you talk about the nerves.

2 months ago

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International Cheetah Day

Dr. P is taking a group of people to Botswana next Sep 14th to the 24th. 12 people are going, there is room for 4 more.

He is also planning a special trip to work with the cheetah in Namibia at the Cheetah Conservation Fund at the end of Botswana trip.

Its International Cheetah day, so if anyone is interested in learning more about this worthwhile organization, or if you are interested in one of the 8 spots available on the cheetah trip at the end of September of 2017, you need to contact him asap.

Here is the link- cheetah.org/news-blog/blog/
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Extern Daily Diary- Rabbit Medicine

My Western University veterinary school training is geared towards dogs and cats. One of the reasons I am doing an externship at LBAH is to learn more about other species. In the last few days I have worked with reptiles, birds, and now a rabbit. The rabbit came in today for neuter surgery using the laser.

This is my first exposure to the laser in surgery, and it is amazing how little bleeding there is. After surgery the patients are much more comfortable. For more information on the rabbit neuter procedure, follow this link: www.lbah.com/word/rabbit/neuter-rabbit/

Every surgery patient receives a pre-anesthetic exam just prior to surgery. In this picture I am using an ophthalmoscope to look inside the eyes
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Extern Daily Diary

I had a busy day today with Dr. P, with many sick pets and lots of clients to call. It was chihuahua day. Several had heart disease, and I was able to hear a murmur on them. We took radiographs and performed EKG's, tomorrow there will be echocardiograms.

If you are up for a challenge, here is the link to our heart page. Cardiology is complicated, so this heart page is not for the faint of heart (pun intended)!
www.lbah.com/word/canine/heart-disease/

Had my first chance to see the laser in surgery. We were performing mammary tumor surgery on a rat. This is a common problem in rats, our web site has more information-
www.lbah.com/word/rat-diseases/

Dr. P gave me a heads up that I better study up on heart anatomy and physiology tonight for tomorrow's rounds, so I bid a farewell until my next Extern Daily Diary.

In the picture I am watching Dr. Y use the laser on the rat with the mammary tumor.
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Extern Daily Diary

Greetings everyone! I am Joseph Lan, a fourth year veterinary student extern. This is my first day here at LBAH.

It has been a very productive morning. I had a chance to meet Dr. P in person and we did rounds on a few cases from the previous day. It was a lot to learn, but will help me in my preparations for my national board exams coming up.

One of our cases was about a dog that had a heart murmur. This murmur might or might not be significant in regards to disease. We will be monitoring and checking it. To learn more about heart disease we have a detailed set of pages on our web site- www.lbah.com/word/canine/heart-disease/

Later on today we have a pet rat that has a mass that requires surgical removal. It will be my first time seeing a surgical procedure on an animal this small!

We will be using the laser to remove the tumor. To learn more about how we use the laser in surgery please follow this link- www.lbah.com/word/services/laser-surgery/

This is a picture of me learning how to listen for a heart murmur with the stethoscope.
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It's Bun Bun day at LBAH

Dr. Kennedy treated one with GI stasis-

www.lbah.com/word/rabbit/gi-stasis-hairballs-in-rabbits/

Our other bunny has a problem with his spine affecting the nerves to the back legs. He was treated with VNA-

www.lbah.com/word/services/vna-veterinary-neuronal-adjustment/

Happy Thanksgiving!
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Piggy Beauty Shop Day

Time to get that pedicure, manicure, and get those teeth looking good again.

We see pigs here at the Long Beach Animal Hospital. In general pigs are illegal to own in Long Beach as they are classified as a farm animal. Certain areas of Long Beach are unincorporated, and allow you to own farm animals.

Male pigs get long and sharp tusks.This pig was sedated and had his tusks trimmed. We took advantage of the sedation and trimmed the nails and hooves, using a dremel to smooth them off.

Visit our web site to learn more about the specific anesthesia we have to use on pigs- www.lbah.com/word/canine/anesthesia/
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Honeymoon crasher

One of the more fascinating animals in the Serengeti is the Dung Beatle. When a couple gets married they go off on their honeymoon and do their "dung" thing.

In this video, another Dung Beatle, not sure if male or female, decides to join the nuptial couple. The interloper was persistent, and came back for more even though he/she was shown the door the first time.
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Tedd GreenwaldSo the Dung Beetle walks into a bar and asks is this stool taken?

2 months ago   ·  1
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Busy Week for our Wildlife Program

Lots of bird fractures, this one from a hawk. This is a severe fracture of the proximal radius and ulna, with soft tissue injury.

www.lbah.com/word/wildlife-photography/
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Dr. Wood preparing for a rabbit spay

Dr. Wood has been doing our rabbit spay's lately. Here she is preparing the instruments for her surgery.

Our anesthetist technician on the left is monitoring important pyhsiologic paramters before the surgery even starts. There are blue and yellow warm water bottles on the bottom of the photo to use in case our patient's body temperature becomes low.

Do you see the heart rate on the monitor at the top left of the picture? It's 277 beats per minute, not unusual for a rabbit like this.

If you would like to learn more about how we spay rabbits follow this link- www.lbah.com/word/rabbit/rabbit-spay/
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Dinner time for this hummer from our Wildlife Program ... See MoreSee Less

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Amy PearsonLove this ❤️❤️

2 months ago
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Meredith KennedyHe's using his tiny little tongue, which is about the size of a thread.

2 months ago
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Dr. Wood is on TV with a barn owl

The Long Beach Lifeguards and Animal Control brought in a barn owl with an injured wing. You can learn more about the story from this video link-
www.foxla.com/news/214099352-video#.WBKk5UCMYaY.facebook

Once we determined the owl did not have any fractures or internal injuries, we wrapped the wing and sent it to one of our capable rehabilitators. It will stay there for several weeks at least until it is ready for release.

A big thanks to everyone involved!

You can learn more about our Wildlife Program-

www.lbah.com/word/wildlife-care/
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Parvo Virus cases uptick at LBAH

In the last 2 weeks we have seen 4 dogs with parvo virus. One of the dogs succumbed to the virus.

That is much more than usual, and reinforces the need to get your dogs parvo vaccine series, starting at 8 weeks at the latest, and giving it monthly until 16 weeks. That is 3 injections.

If you are concerned about your dog or it's exposure to parvo, which is a fatal disease in some dogs, we can start the vaccine series at 6 weeks, give it every 2 weeks, and continue it beyond 16 weeks. This is important in dogs like Rotties and Dobies, and even some pitbulls, since they seem to be especially hard hit, and are usually the ones that do not make it.

Our web site has a detailed page on parvo virus and its treatment:

www.lbah.com/word/canine/parvo-virus/

We use a special in house test kit that is highly accurate and gives us an immediate answer.

The two vertical bars on this fecal parvo test are positive.
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Nancy SalemThat's scary as it's highly contagious

2 months ago
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Julian is well on his way

We had a shower for Talia last night. Julian is due on Dec 20th, so there might be a Christmas baby!
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Meredith KennedyCan't wait to meet him!

2 months ago
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Belted kingfisher

It was found unable to stand and was brought into our Wildlife Program. Dr. Wood examined it and found no obvious reason for this problem.

We took a radiograph and found a large gas and fluid-filled mass in the posterior abdomen. Ultrasound revealed a possible cystic mass connected to the intestines. This mass was probably putting pressure on the nerves to the back legs, causing the paralysis.

To learn more about how we care for injured wildlife for free at our hospital please follow this link:

www.lbah.com/word/wildlife-care/
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Danielle CruthirdsCheryl Roberts..look a kingfisher! Poor baby.

2 months ago

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Long Beach Animal Hospital added 3 new photos.

Feline Continuing Education Sunday

Dr. P and Dr. W spent their Sunday updating their knowledge on feline medicine.
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Buddy, our bladder stone dog, is back to his usual "Buddy" self. Scroll down to November 8th to see his radiographs. ... See MoreSee Less

What's Your Diagnosis

I have circled the problem area in the lungs. We have another view of this cat from a different angle, and even though it could be a foreign body in the esophagus from this view, the other view shows there is nothing stuck in the esophagus.

The cat has a lung tumor. It has minimal symptoms, which shows the importance of diagnostic tests in pets that cannot talk, routinely hide symptoms, and are older.

To learn much more about how we make a diagnosis in animals please follow this link:

www.lbah.com/word/the-diagnostic-process/
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Nancy SalemThat's amazing. Did the owner smoke?

2 months ago
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Long Beach Animal HospitalNope, non-smoker

2 months ago   ·  1
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Mary AldrichAs a human ex-xray tech, I loved this exercise. Really good lateral considering your subject.

2 months ago
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Long Beach Animal Hospital added 8 new photos.

Beach Streets Midtown- Anaheim Street

It was great to have a few hours of no cars on Anaheim St. As you can see from the photos it was well received and a good time was had by all. Antoni and Alex even had a chance to get their picture taken with some musicians.
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Nancy SalemI guess this means no clients either.

2 months ago
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Long Beach Animal HospitalActually, we were quite busy. People we able to park on the side streets.

2 months ago   ·  1
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What's Your Diagnosis

Labeled radiograph of prior post, showing the major structures. Does this help with your diagnosis?
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Nancy SalemFluid in lungs?

2 months ago
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Long Beach Animal HospitalSorry Nancy, not the main problem.

2 months ago
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Phil SchoenbornLooks like an esophageal foreign body stuck at the heart.

2 months ago
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Long Beach Animal HospitalSorry Phil, veterinarians are not allowed to comment.

2 months ago   ·  1
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What's Your Diagnosis

This is from an elderly cat that came in for a routine geriatric exam. This chest radiograph has some significant findings. I will label the anatomic structures in a post tomorrow after you have had a chance to study this radiograph.
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Long Beach Animal HospitalYou are on the right track Lauren. I will send labeled anatomy later today and lets see what you think then.

2 months ago
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Long Beach Animal HospitalIt's never too late!

2 months ago
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Buddy is feeling much better now!

Buddy has had a rough go of it recently. His Addison's disease is under control, and with a few changes instituted after his last diagnostic tests, we expect him to continue to do well.

His last ultrasound showed he had some stones in the kidneys and urinary bladder. We planned on addressing them in the near future once he responded to the new drug doses for his Addison's disease.

The near future came earlier than planned. Buddy had a difficult time urinating this week. Radiographs revealed that one of the larger stones passed out of the bladder and lodged behind what is called the os penis in a dog. You can see it stuck there on the first radiograph. This made it very difficult to urinate to say the least.

We had to flush it back into the bladder and then remove all of the stones surgically. Once we get the stones analyzed we will set up a plan to try to prevent their recurrence. We need to balance this new treatment plan with our treatment plan for Addison's also.

In the first radiograph the black arrow points to the stone at the base of his os penis

In the 2nd radiograph you can see the stone as it has been flushed back towards the bladder with a catheter. It now resides in what is called the pelvic urethra. We don't want to do surgery to remove it from this location because it has the potential for post operative complications.

In the 3rd radiograph you can see this stone, along with other stones, in the urinary bladder. There are smaller stones outside of the red circle to the right that are also in the urinary bladder. We need to get them all out during surgery.

In the next radiograph, taken after surgery to remove the stones, you can see under the red circle over the urinary bladder that there are no more stones. Notice the metallic staples under the red circle.

A close up of the stone shows how rough its edges are. There were several of these in his urinary bladder.

The last pictures shows Buddy with his happy mom!

You can learn much more about bladder stones and Addison's disease from our web site at the following links:

www.lbah.com/word/canine/bladder-stones/

www.lbah.com/word/canine/addisons-disease-hypoadrenocorticism/

Yea buddy!
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Fe Valentino Felipe PapelianGreat news- Yaye for Buddy ❤️❤️❤️

2 months ago
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Amy HansonI want to thank Dr. Palazollo and Dr. Kennedy...you two are a blessing to your profession. Thank you for the compassion, expertise, knowledge and love. Your angels both of you as well as the others who helped with our little boys care. You're top notch people!

2 months ago   ·  4
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Cheryl KellyYes Buddy😜💃💃

2 months ago
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Nikki Berrios RoseGlad you're on the upswing. I hope he heals quickly.

2 months ago
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Becki Morris PockalnyGood news!

2 months ago
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Brian HansonExcellent

2 months ago
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Lorie Ann BallGlad they are taking great care of Buddy :)

2 months ago
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Long Beach Animal Hospital added 2 new photos.

That's a Whole Lot of Fingers!

It takes several sets of hands (with interesting nail polish) to assist feed this baby tortoise.
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Jamie CaparoVery cute to look at!

3 months ago
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Mary AldrichJustification for the nails; they served a purpose.

3 months ago
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Long Beach Animal HospitalHi Mary! How are you and Scott doing?

3 months ago

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Anaheim Street Closure

On Saturday, November 12, 2016, the City of Long Beach will be presenting "Beach Streets Midtown", an open street event. We will have a booth outside our hospital supporting this event.

Anaheim Street will be blocked off from Orange Avenue to Pacific Coast Highway. Anaheim Street will be open to "foot traffic" and any mode of transportation without a motor (bicycles, skates, rollerblades, skateboards, etc). No cars will be allowed.

At 6 am, all cars parked along the route will be towed and the city will begin closing streets with barricades. By 8 am, full closure will be in effect. The event runs from 9 am to 3 pm. At 3:30 pm, the city will begin to reopen the route and expects the street to be fully open to traffic by 5:30 pm.

Please call us at 562-434-9966 if you have any questions.

We have mapped out a couple of options to get to LBAH, one from the East and one from the West.
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Exotic Case of the Week

Ball Python attacked by a cat. The owner saw it happen and pulled the cat away and brought the snake right in. This is important because cats carry a bacteria called Pasteurella multocida that can cause a serious internal infection. The sooner we get the wound cleaned, and get this snake on antibiotics, the greater the chance it will heal.

The picture is from a recheck one week later. So far it is healing well and the snake is doing fine.

Hoping for full recovery! May take a few shedding cycles for color patterns to return to normal on the scales.
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Tammy BoykinWas the snake someone's pet??

3 months ago
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Long Beach Animal HospitalYes, it is a very friendly and easy to care for pet.

3 months ago   ·  1
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Long Beach Animal Hospital added 2 new photos.

Happy Halloween!

We all know how much Cheyenne loves getting dressed up for Halloween and having his picture posted on FB!
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Brad WingersLove it........even tho Cheyenne.......might feel otherwise. Hey, new hair styles for the girls?!?!

3 months ago   ·  1
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Leslie Abrahams GoslingCheyenne <3

3 months ago
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Cesar Millan and Dog Nation

Nat Geo called us because they were filming an episode in Long Beach on Saturday and needed a veterinarian to ensure the safety of the dogs on the show.

Dr. Kennedy and Dr. P went on a beautiful day and watched Cesar educate people on dog behavior. Our biggest concern was the heat, but all of the dogs came through fine.

There was lots of film crew present, no dogs had any problems, Cesar helped some people with their dog problems, and a good time was had by all.

The production crew was quite professional and a pleasure to work with.
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Meredith KennedyWhat a fantastic day! It was great fun watching Cesar help dog owners with their behavioral issues, all of whom were helped by simply calming down. It was great fun seeing so many pet lovers in one spot, too.

3 months ago   ·  1
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Long Beach Animal Hospital added 6 new photos.

Wildlife Case of the Week- Glue Trap Sparrow

Oops, looks like this sparrow landed at the wrong airport. After stabilization we were able to gently extricate him from the glue. We are keeping him overnight before release just to make sure he has fully recovered.

You can learn much more about our Wildlife Program at this link- www.lbah.com/word/wildlife-care/
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Tedd GreenwaldUse olive oil to soften the glue. More oil to remove any residue on the claws. I saved a Broad Headed Skink and did not remove any of his little toes.

3 months ago   ·  1
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Leslie Abrahams GoslingGood job!

3 months ago
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Dr. Y in Surgery

In the last week we have cared for many pets with terrible teeth. These rotting teeth were painful, made eating difficult, and increased the chance of a liver, heart, or kidney problem due to the chronic bacteria in the bloodstream.

These pets needed pre-anesthetic blood panels to make sure these organs were ready for anesthesia. After careful assesement with an oral exam and radiographs, we pulled the rotten teeth. Recovery is fast and they feel dramatically better.

This is a serious and preventable condition. Our web page has all the details- www.lbah.com/word/canine/dental-disease/
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Long Beach Animal Hospital added 2 new photos.

American Cancer Society Bark for Life

Dr. P, Dr. W, and Sandra are there right now to answer questions. Earlier in the day Dr. P gave a presentation on animal cancer to an enthusiastic group.

Come join us on this beautiful Saturday!
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Brad WingersAwesome!

3 months ago
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Animal Cancer - Bark for Life

Join us tomorrow of a fun and educational event regarding cancer in animals and people. We will have a booth, and Dr. P will talk about cancer in animals at 10 AM.

main.acsevents.org/site/TR/RelayForLife/BFLCY17CA?sid=204751&type=fr_informational&pg=information...
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Long Beach Animal Hospital added 6 new photos.

Wildlife Case of the Week

A burrowing owl was brought to us unable to fly. A thorough exam revealed no obvioius problems, so a radiograph was taken to look for internal problems or a fractured bone. Birds of prey commonly come to us with these fractures. This owl does not have a fracture, so we are giving it supportive care.

Dr. Wood will be working with our wildlife extensively, and as you can see from her picture, she is thrilled to be a part of our Wildlife Program. www.lbah.com/word/wildlife-care/
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Heart monitor

One of our canine patients came in for excess panting. Our exam gave us an indication he had a heart disease, so we placed a monitor on him, called a Holter monitor, that would perform a continuous EKG for 24 hours. He had over 117,000 beats of his heart in the 24 hour period we monitored.

Heart disease is complicated stuff, and if you are up for the challenge, here is the link on our web site:

www.lbah.com/word/canine/heart-disease/
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Long Beach Animal Hospital added 2 new photos.

Our New Surgeon

Dr. Wood got in some good surgery time this week. Here she is wearing her fancy laser glasses for an eyelid tumor. It was detailed and meticulous work.

We oftentimes use the laser on these tumors to minimize bleeding and swelling post operatively. Patients feel less pain also due to the laser's ability to soothe nerve ends.

Here is a link to our surgery page for more information, including a link to how we perform laser surgery:

new.lbah.com/word/surgical-services/
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Hibernation Time

With cooler weather upon us, California Desert Tortoises will be going into hibernation soon. This is Mother Nature’s way of protecting cold-blooded animals in cooler weather or when food and water become scarce.

I recommend a pre-hibernation exam to make sure the tortoise is healthy enough to hibernate and check for bladder stones. My tortoises go into hibernation just before Halloween.

Dr. Ridgeway and his tortoise Speedy, who loves to eat hibiscus flowers.
www.lbah.com/word/reptile/tortoise-bladder-stones/
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Michelle Baccaro, Meredith Kennedy and 15 others like this

Gloria Sosa LarsenWow! I am wondering if that is the same tortoise you had 15 yers ago Dr Ridgeway?? I was babysitting your kiddos at that time, remember me? 😀 Say hi to Trish and the kids, which I am thinking, are teenagers now 😱

3 months ago
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Leslie Abrahams GoslingMy tortoise goes into hibernation mid September xx

3 months ago
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Long Beach Animal Hospital added 11 new photos.

Its cute critter week at LBAH!
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