What's Been Happening at LBAH | Long Beach Animal Hospital

What’s Been Happening at LBAH

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Check out this extensive list of people, pets, medical and surgical problems, and staff that we have been involved with over the last year.

Answer to yesterday's mystery diagnosis

Here is what the eye looked like after laser surgery.

You can see the complete surgery from beginning to end at this link-

www.lbah.com/word/guinea-pig/guinea-pig-eye-surgery/
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Answer to yesterdays mystery diagnosis 

Here is what the eye looked like after laser surgery.

You can see the complete surgery from beginning to end at this link-

https://www.lbah.com/word/guinea-pig/guinea-pig-eye-surgery/

 

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Great job, Dr William Ridgeway! Carl, did you know that Bill and I were chemistry lab partners at USC?!

I love Dr Ridgeway!

Piggie must feel so much better. 😘 Get well buddy.

Mystery Diagnosis

What is going on with this Guinea Pig?
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Mystery Diagnosis

What is going on with this Guinea Pig?

 

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ingrown lash?

🤔some kind of respiratory infection? I was told when Guinea's eyes are watery its indication of resp issue.

What is the foriei

what is the foreign object? S

Poor thing. Ouch!

is that a foxtail?

Eyelash abnormalities - trichiasis?

Poor baby. How irritating that can be. How was it treated?

Distichiasis

Good guess! It is the Guinea Pig version of that.

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1 week ago

Long Beach Animal Hospital

Answer to yesterday's Mystery X-Ray

The original radiograph is reposted. The second radiograph points to the arthritis (called spondylosis) all along this dog's spine. Circled are the greatly enlarged sub lumbar lymph nodes.

The diagnosis is anal sac adenocarcinoma with metastasis to the sub lumber lymph nodes.

You can see the chemotherapy drugs that were administered by the Veterinary Cancer Group. They helped him for quite a while, and were a big help in this dog's quality of life.

You can also see the acupuncture Dr. Seto performed to help him in general, and also to treat his arthritis.

To learn more about lymph nodes follow this link:
www.lbah.com/word/canine/lymph-node-diseases/

To learn more about arthritis follow this link:
www.lbah.com/word/canine/arthritis/

To learn more about cancer in general follow this link:
www.lbah.com/word/canine/canine-fractured-tibia-shinbone/
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Mystery X-ray time

The last few ones have been a little too easy (or else there are several budding veterinary radiologists on FB), so I am going to turn up the heat a teeny notch and see if you can figure out this one.

It is a lateral abdominal radiograph from an elderly dog that is losing weight.
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Mystery X-ray time

The last few ones have been a little too easy (or else there are several budding veterinary radiologists on FB), so I am going to turn up the heat a teeny notch and see if you can figure out this one.

It is a lateral abdominal radiograph from an elderly dog that is losing weight.

 

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Intestinal parasites

He ate some shoelaces

Hook worms

Growth pushing colon down, enlarged lymph nodes??

parasites

Lots of tapeworms.. or maybe roundworms?

Tape worm

Intestinal blockage

aliens

Intestinal mass or obstruction.

Spondylosis

prostate hyperplasia and reactive lymph nodes. Spondylosis in vertebrae

Intestines don't exactly look right to me.

A cat swallowed a string

Its dog and it did not swallow a string.

Looks like a prostate issue !

Tapeworm

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Tortoise shell answer

Good job to all of those that knew we were cutting the shell (called the plastron) for surgery for bladder stone removal. Those that asked if it was a female and we were going to remove her eggs is a good answer also.,

You can see from this radiograph that these bladder stones in tortoises are huge. To watch the whole surgery, including how we put the shell back together with fiberglass from a surfboard shop, and to even see the beating heart during the surgery, click on this link:
www.lbah.com/word/reptile/tortoise-bladder-stones/
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Tortoise shell answer

Good job to all of those that knew we were cutting the shell (called the plastron) for surgery for bladder stone removal. Those that asked if it was a female and we were going to remove her eggs is a good answer also.,

You can see from this radiograph that these bladder stones in tortoises are huge. To watch the whole surgery, including how we put the shell back together with fiberglass from a surfboard shop, and to even see the beating heart during the surgery, click on this link:
https://www.lbah.com/word/reptile/tortoise-bladder-stones/

 

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i love that you share these!

Kathy Neiheisel

This was such an interesting read! Turk has a bladder stone when we got him he was only just a year old and the stone was 2.5cm big! Our vet said he had never performed this procedure on a tortoise so tiny but it all went amazingly 😁

That was amazing!!

That was a great read.

How can you prevent them from forming?

We don't know why they form, so prevention is hard to recommend.

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